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Apr 15, 2014

Gingr

This post was written by H&W instructor, Ginger Garner, PT, MPT, ATC, PYT, who teaches the Yoga as Medicine for Pregnancy and Labor & Delivery and Postpartum courses, and is teaching her brand new course, Extra-Articular Pelvic and Hip Labrum Injury, in June in Akron, OH.

 

In my previous two posts, I have discussed The Postpartum Hip and Labral Tear Risk and The Importance of Early Intervention in Labral Tears. Today I want to highlight the importance of the iliopsoas and its potential contribution to intraarticular injury sequelae at the hip joint.

 


Apr 15, 2014

The first round of certification candidates have completed their testing, and we will soon announce the test takers who will be awarded with the letters "PRPC" for Pelvic Rehabilitation Practitioner Certification. Just over 70 candidates sat for the exam during our inaugural 2014 testing window, and are now eagering awaiting their results (we thank them for their patience!).

 

Each step of this vigorous (and often tedious) process has been guided by Kryterion, a company who specializes in certification development. We want to give you an update about where we are in the process as many are interested in finding out how they performed on the test.

 

The "cut score" for passing the exam and earning the certification can only be determined after all the examinees have completed the exam, so we could not begin our work until the testing window closed on March 1st. Then, a group of 11-14 SME's (Subject Matter Experts) are gathered together on phone and web conferences to review each item. An SME is a person who meets the criteria to take the PRPC exam but cannot be someone who took the exam this year. Many of the SME's are therapists who have been involved in the process from the beginning, others have joined the group specifically for this last step, the review process.


Apr 14, 2014

Teri Elliott-Burke

This post was written by H&W faculty member Teri Elliott-Burke, PT, MHS, BCB-PMD. Teri will be teaching Pelvic Floor Level 2A in Maywood, IL next month.

 

A new product has hit the stores – Butterfly Body Liners. These pads are specifically designed to deal with fecal incontinence (aka ABL – Accidental Bowel Leakage). The good news is that advertisements for these pads bring fecal incontinence out in the open. The ads promote discussion of this topic and offer one solution for this condition. A patient first brought this product to my attention. So I thought it would be a good idea for all of you to know about them as well (as I have discussed the concept of the pad with other patients they have liked the idea). However, I would also like to voice two concerns: One is that the pads seem pricey ($.30 each) especially for patients who have to change them often or are on a fixed income. My second reaction is that for some people these small pads don’t have enough capacity to deal with the problem.

 


Apr 11, 2014

Dee Hartmann

This post was written by H&W instructor Dee Hartmann PT, DPT. This year, H&W is thrilled to be offering a brand new coure instructed by Dee, Assessing and Treating Women with Vulvodynia.This course will be offered in September in Waterford, CT.

 

 

What's love (and sex) got to do, got to do with it?


Apr 10, 2014

 

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Research completed by medical faculty of Heidelberg University in Germany aimed to better understand the characteristics of pain that can be caused by different structures or tissues within the low back. Is the information gained applicable to all layers of tissues in the body? If so, how does that assist with our structural evaluation and interventions? If not, how do various body regions reflect the findings of this study?

 


Apr 09, 2014

What is a hymenectomy, and how does it relate to pelvic rehabilitation? To answer this question, an understanding of hymenal anatomy is useful. The hymen is tissue that lines and sometimes covers the vaginal opening. This layer of tissue can be thick or thin, and can have a variety of presentations based on embryological development such as micro perforations, bands, or septa which create distinct openings into the vaginal canal. During menstruation, having an opening through the hymen is critical so that menstrual discharge does not become blocked, and sexual function is optimized when the hymen does not create any narrowing or blockage. When the hymen completely covers the vaginal opening the condition is known as "imperforate hymen." Sometimes this anatomical variation is noticed during neonatal and early childhood examinations, unfortunately, the condition may also be undiagnosed. 

 

 

Prior to her first gynecological examination, an adolescent female may be at risk for consequences of an imperforate hymen. Depending on the hymenal variation, a young female may experience urinary dysfunction or vaginal infection, but more typical is recognition of the issue when her menstrual cycle begins. Case reports in the literature describe the condition as presenting clinically as low back pain, or as abdominal pain. Complaints that may increase our suspicion about the condition in an adolescent patient may include amenorrhea, abdominal mass, abdominal pain, urinary retention, or constipation. 

 


Apr 08, 2014

Allison Ariail

 

This post was written by H&W instructor Allison Ariail, PT, DPT, CLT-LANA, BCB-PMD. Allison will be instructing the Rehabilitative Ultrasound course in Seatlte in May.

 

 


Apr 08, 2014

Do women who have pelvic girdle pain in pregnancy have altered gait patterns? The answer to this question was the aim of a study published in the European Spine Journal in 2008 by Wu and colleagues. Pelvic girdle pain, defined by Vleeming and colleagues as "…a specific form of low back pain (LBP) that can occur separately or in conjunction with LBP…" has been estimated to occur as often as 50% in pregnancy. (Gutke et al., 2006) Unfortunately, of the women who develop pelvic girdle pain in pregnancy, research has demonstrated that 1 in 4 women will develop chronic postpartum pain. (Ostgaard et al., 1991) Pelvic girdle pain can appear as mild, moderate, or severely debilitating, and can be confirmed using provocation tests such as the posterior pelvic provocation test and the active straight leg raise (ASLR). Our role as pelvic rehabilitation providers is critical in minimizing the functional impact of pelvic girdle pain during and following pregnancy. 

 

 

In regards to gait changes in women who present with PGP in pregnancy, in general, walking velocity is reduced, is negatively correlated with fear of movement, and there are changes in thorax and pelvic rotations. In the study by Wu and colleagues, kinematics were examined in 11 women with PGP and 12 pelvic-healthy controls. Findings within the patients with PGP include that transverse segmental rotation amplitudes were larger, and peak thorax rotation occurred earlier in the stride cycle at higher velocities. The authors suggest that this change in thorax rotation may aid in avoiding excessive spinal rotations caused by larger segmental rotations, or in limiting the motion in the lumbopelvic region.. They further describe that in healthy subjects, pelvic rotations are relatively out-of-phase with the lower extremities at lower velocities, and more in-phase during higher velocities, and that this pattern may be altered in the presence of PGP.

 


Apr 07, 2014

Michelle Lyons

This post was written by guest-blogger, H&W faculty member Michelle Lyons, PT, MISCP, who will be teaching her brand-new course, The Athlete and the Pelvic Floor, in Columbus,OH in August..


‘I approached my advisor and told him that for my PhD thesis I wanted to study the pelvis." He replied ‘That will be the shortest thesis ever…there are three bones and some ligaments. You will be done by next week.’ I told him ‘I think there is more to it’.  (Andry Vleeming Phd 2002)

 


Apr 03, 2014

Peter

 

 

This post was written by H&W faculty member Peter Philip, who developed a course on chronic pelvic pain and differential diagnosis for the Institute. 

 


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Upcoming Continuing Education Courses

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Durham, NC (SOLD OUT)
Apr 25, 2014 - Apr 27, 2014
Location: Duke University Medical Center

Myofascial Release for Pelvic Dysfunction - Portland, OR
Apr 25, 2014 - Apr 27, 2014
Location: Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center

Finding the Driver in Pelvic Pain - Milwaukee, WI
May 01, 2014 - May 03, 2014
Location: Marquette University

Visceral Mobilization of the Urologic System - Winfield, IL
May 02, 2014 - May 04, 2014
Location: Central DuPage Hospital Conference Room

Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging: Women's Health and Orthopedic Topics - Seattle, WA
May 03, 2014 - May 05, 2014
Location: Swedish Hospital - Issaquah campus

Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging Orthopedic Topics - Seattle, WA
May 03, 2014 - May 04, 2014
Location: Swedish Hospital - Issaquah campus

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Scottsdale, AZ (SOLD OUT)
May 16, 2014 - May 18, 2014
Location: Womens Center for Wellness and Rehabilitation

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - Maywood, IL (SOLD OUT!)
May 16, 2014 - May 18, 2014
Location: Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine

Pelvic Floor Level 3 - San Diego, CA
May 30, 2014 - Jun 01, 2014
Location: FunctionSmart Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Arlington, VA (SOLD OUT)
Jun 06, 2014 - Jun 08, 2014
Location: Virginia Hospital Center

Care of the Postpartum Patient - Houston, TX
Jun 07, 2014 - Jun 08, 2014
Location: Texas Children’s Hospital

Bowel Pathology and Function - Minneapolis, MN
Jun 07, 2014 - Jun 08, 2014
Location: Park Nicollet Clinic--St. Louis Park

Oncology and the Female Pelvic Floor - Orlando, FL
Jun 21, 2014 - Jun 22, 2014
Location: Florida Hospital Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation

Myofascial Release for Pelvic Dysfunction - Dayton, OH
Jun 22, 2014 - Jun 23, 2014
Location: Southview Hospital

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - Derby, CT
Jun 27, 2014 - Jun 29, 2014
Location: Griffin Hospital