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Aug 29, 2014

c-section

A systematic review aimed to identify the burden of the most significant complications of postoperative abdominopelvic adhesions. Of the nearly 200 studies included in the review, the following categories were included: small bowel obstruction (n=125), difficulties during subsequent operation (n=62), infertility (n=11), and chronic pain (n=5). The incidence of postoperative small bowel obstruction, assessed among nearly 108,000 patients in 92 studies, was 9% overall. The incidence of adhesive small bowel obstruction was 2.4% and was highest in pediatric and in lower gastrointestinal tract surgery. The authors report a high rate of chronic abdominal pain in patients who were followed after lower gastrointestinal tract surgery, with adhesions identified as a significant cause of this pain. Following colorectal surgery for small bowel disease, pregnancy rates were found to be dramatically lower than the pregnancy rates in those who were medically treated. Additionally, patients who have had a prior surgery may require additional time in a subsequent procedure due to scar tissue, and adhesiolysis, used to break up adhesions, can lead to bowel injury.

 

Patients with postoperative adhesions, according to the systematic review, are most often treated by providers other than the one who did the surgery; the lack of awareness of the complication may be one reason that the incidence of adhesions is underestimated. The value of being aware of the higher incidence of postoperative adhesions may be in early recognition of a complication, surgical decision-making, and patient counseling. While the research is young in relation to adhesions and pelvic rehabilitation, one study that we previously discussed in the blog addresses visceral mobilization techniques in an animal model. While the animal model research is promising, there are numerous case reports describing the positive effects of visceral mobilization techniques for abdominopelvic pain, and therapists always report on the equally positive changes to their clinical practice outcomes after adding visceral techniques to their toolbox.

 

There are 2 upcoming opportunities to learn visceral mobilization: Level 1 in Scottsdale covering the Urologic system and Level 2 in Boston covering the reproductive system.


Aug 28, 2014

One of the questions we frequently receive at the Institute is "Do you have any research about ___________?" At times, therapists are looking for information that can help with patient care, or they might be looking for support in a claims denial letter, or foundational material for a presentation. If you have been taught how to find articles, this may seem like a simple task. Many of us therapists went to school when the only use of a computer was for word processing, if we were lucky enough to have progressed from the typewriter or even the electronic typewriter. (Imagine no Google, no Wikipedia, and no Amazon to purchase textbooks!) There are basic search skills that can be shared so that every person interested in a particular topic can find recent articles in free search engines. While the full article may not be available, many times you will have access to full articles that synthesize recent works. (One website that you can use that offers full text article access is PubMed Central.) If you are not interested in reading articles, but prefer to read a scholarly summary of a health topic, check out www.uptodate.com, where you can subscribe to have full access to excellent evidence-based summaries. You can read through the reference lists on the site as well to see if there is a resource that you want to track down.

 

One method of finding articles is to go to www.googlescholar.com. In the search bar, type in the topic you are interested in, such as "urinary incontinence." You will then be provided with a list of all articles that have urinary and/or incontinence in the title or in the key words of the research. An even more refined way to conduct your search is by using Boolean terms, in which you connect your search words by "AND" or other key terms. To see this in action, let's say you want to know if there is any research about urinary incontinence and prostatectomy surgery. Try completing a google scholar search by typing in the following: "urinary incontinence" AND "prostatectomy". (Be sure to use the quotation marks and type the word "AND" in capital letters.) You will see that you come up with some very nice articles about the specific topic you searched. To make sure you are looking at recent articles, go to the left side of the search page and under the words "Any time" choose an option such as "Since 2010" so that you are seeing articles from within the last 5 years. Next, maybe you want to know if there is evidence for rehabilitation. Add the word rehabilitation, like this: "urinary incontinence" AND "prostatectomy" AND "rehabilitation". You will see that you now have even more results specific to rehabilitation of the condition. On the right side of the page you might see a link that starts with [PDF] where, if you click on it, you will usually be brought to the full article rather than just the abstract. If you see an article that you think fits your search, you can also click on "Related articles" located under the brief description of the article.

 

Being able to look up articles serves many purposes, including staying updated on patient care, and discussing evidence with peers, providers, and patients. Another valuable reason to find your own research is when studying for certification exams such as the Pelvic Rehabilitation Practitioner Certification (PRPC). On the PRPC certification page on our website, you can find a list of some articles for which we have added links. (Remember that there is no need to print out articles anymore! Save a tree and simply save the articles as a PDF file. You can name the article by the author's last name, year and main topic, and store in a folder on your computer so it is easy to access- no file drawer required!) If you are thinking about taking the PRPC exam, there is no time like the present to get your application put together! The deadline for applying is October 1 of this year, with the test taking place in the first couple weeks of November. Personally, I have enjoyed reading the blog posts introducing therapists who have earned their PRPC title- the reasons for seeking the distinction are very interesting and meaningful. We would love to see your name on the list of certified therapists, so check out the details on the website and contact us if you have any questions about the PRPC application process!


Aug 28, 2014

In our weekly feature section, Pelvic Rehab Report is proud to present this interview with newly certified practitioner Janelle Trippany PT, DPT, CLT-LANA, PRPC

 

PRPC

How did you get involved in the pelvic rehabilitation field?

I knew that I wanted to treat the pelvic floor as soon as I attended the 3 hour lecture regarding this niche of rehab while I was earning my DPT. The woman giving the lecture was so knowledgeable and so passionate about what she was doing with her life. I was fortunate enough to be able to have my last 12 week clinical with a woman who specialized in pelvic rehab, and from there I was completely sold. Unlike many others in this field, I went straight into a job in a women’s health clinic. While I have moved on from there to my current job, I will always continue to be involved in the pelvic rehabilitation field.

 

Describe your clinical practice:


Aug 26, 2014

This post was written by H&W instructor Peter Philip, PT, ScD, COMT, PRPC. Peter will be instructing the course that he wrote on "Differential Diagnostics of Chronic Pelvic Pain" in Connecticut this October.

 

yoga

We have ourselves a wonderful profession, one in which we have the education that allows us to directly and often immediately impact our patients' well-being. Very often, patients come to us with the most intimate and consuming injuries. Often, our patients have been to several other clinicians seeking assistance. Many have been told that their ailment is psychosomatic, and that they should ‘get over it’, or medicate themselves through their pain.

 

Many patients have lost their ability to live the life that they had enjoyed for so many years prior because of this gnawing pain that involves a region of their body that they’d rather not discuss, let alone have poked and prodded. Many of our patients suffer so greatly that they’ve lost their relationships, employment and enjoyment of life. Many clinicians have had the experience of losing a patient, one that had suffered for too long and decided that death was the only reasonable means to eliminate their pain. Yes, those of us that have chosen to help those suffering with pelvic pains and dysfunctions have knowingly or unknowingly accepted the responsibility to address those ailments and individuals that suffer greatly; our responsibility is enormous.

 


Aug 26, 2014

In an article describing vascular dysfunction in women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP), Foong and colleagues describe the common finding of pelvic venous congestion. This study aimed to determine changes in microcirculatory function in women with chronic pelvic pain compared to controls. Eighteen women presenting with chronic pelvic pain of at least 1 year and 13 women without pelvic pain or congestion were evaluated for isovolumetric venous pressure, miscrovascular filtration capacity, and limb blood flow. All women were of reproductive age, menstruating regularly, and measurements were made during the mid follicular and the midluteal stages of the same 28 day cycle. The 18 women with CPP fit previously established criteria for pelvic congestion.

 

The women in the patient group were re-evaluated at 5-6 months following treatment for pelvic congestion, with treatment including medication-induced suppression of ovarian function for 6 months, and in 4 patients, hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy. All of the patients received daily hormone replacement therapy (Premarin and Provera) "…to minimize the hypo-oestrogenic effects of treatment."

 

Findings of the research include an elevation in isovolumetric venous pressure, or Pvi in women with CPP compared to controls. Interestingly, there were no changes related to menstrual cycle in measures of microvascular filtration capacity and and limb blood flow. The conclusion of this study is that women with chronic pelvic pain may present with systemic microvascular dysfunction. The noted increase in Pvi "…may be attributable to systemic increases in post capillary resistance secondary to neutrophil activation." Following treatment for pelvic congestion, the value changes in isovolumetric venous pressure were no longer present.

 

This research highlights the noted changes in microcirculatory function in women with chronic pelvic pain. The obligatory chicken and egg conversation weighs in: does pelvic congestion lead to pelvic pain, or does pelvic pain always precede pelvic congestion? While the answer is probably that either condition can cause and perpetuate the other, as pelvic rehabilitation providers, our first thought might be: what would the research outcomes be if the treatment were not medication-induced ovarian suppression or surgery, but therapy directed to the pelvic pain and congestion? The Institute offered, for the first time last year, a course that allows the therapist to address pelvic pain through treatment of pelvic lymphatic drainage. The Lymphatic Drainage for Pelvic Pain continuing education course is a 2-day class instructed by Debora Hickman, a certified lymphedema therapist. Sign up now to save your seat in October in San Diego, and if you can't make this course, contact us to let us know you are interested in this special topics course, and we will keep you informed of any new course bookings!


Aug 25, 2014

In our weekly feature section, Pelvic Rehab Report is proud to present this interview with newly certified practitioner Marika Zandstra PT, PRPC

 

PRPC

What motivated you to earn PRPC?

 

I was motivated to earn my PRPC because I wanted to promote the field of pelvic rehabilitation as well as my own practice. I believe that certification examinations give credibility to the quality of treatment that patients are already receiving and I wanted to be a part of improving the awareness as to the type and quality of treatment that pelvic specialists provide. I felt the PRPC was more focused specifically on pelvic conditions and therefore, more applicable to my current practice.

 


Aug 22, 2014

hip joint

What structures may be implicated in posterior hip pain in the athlete? This question is addressed in a comprehensive article that can be accessed here. Complaints of posterior hip pain are increasingly common, and the differential diagnosis can include a variety of conditions and structures. The differential diagnosis of posterior hip pain may include hip extensor or hip rotator muscle strain, femoroacetabular impingement, proximal hamstring rupture, piriformis syndrome, and referral from the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint, and systemic conditions such as cancer or infection, according to the article. To this list, could we add sciatic and other nerves in the buttock and pelvic floor, ischial injuries or ischial bursa irritation? With lists that include both systemic dysfunction and a variety of potential neuromusculoskeletal causes of posterior hip pain, the therapist must have a comprehensive ability to apply clinical reasoning, expert interview, and solid clinical examination and evaluation skills.

 

Posterior hip pain is only one type of hip pain, and one complaint within the world of pelvic pain. How does the therapist keep sharp tools for diagnosing musculoskeletal conditions, other connective tissue dysfunctions, as well as screen for disease conditions and other dysfunctions that can mimic hip or pelvic pain? Herman & Wallace has increased our offerings of courses towards differential diagnosis of hip and pelvic pain, including Biomechanical Assessment of the Hip & Pelvis, taught recently by Steve Dischiavi. (Stay tuned for Steve's upcoming course schedule!)

 

Another continuing education course that offers excellent opportunity to fine tune your skills in Differential Diagnosis of Pelvic Pain is coming up in October in Connecticut. The course is instructed by Peter Philip, who completed his Doctor of Science degree on the topic of Differential Diagnostics of Pelvic Pain. In addition to learning detailed anatomy and palpation skills, the participant can take away from the course a better understanding of embryology, the somatic and autonomic nervous system, and pelvic conditions that may be caused by or influenced by pelvic pain. The course will include both internal and external pelvic muscle examination techniques. With seven labs scheduled in this continuing education course, the participant will have abundant opportunities to practice instructed skills.


Aug 21, 2014

In our weekly feature section, Pelvic Rehab Report is proud to present this interview with newly certified practitioner Christina McManigal, PT, DPT, PRPC

 

PRPC

How did you get involved in the pelvic rehabilitation field?

Initially, I had an interest in women’s health because I grew up around a family full of laughter and women who crossed their legs a lot. I thought, ‘This isn’t right, there must be something that can be done about this’. I also experienced pelvic pain myself due to excessive running, and became more and more intrigued about how to address these problems without surgery or medications. The answers doctors or Dr. Google (the internet) always had were frightening – cancer, cysts, surgery must be needed... None of that resonated with me, so I pursued a clinical rotation in women’s health and was very fortunate to connect with Heather Jeffcoat PT, DPT. She inspired me to further pursue women’s health and specifically pregnancy/postpartum and pelvic pain education. Heather was pregnant at the time of being my CI which was great learning experience. She also taught me what a positive impact physical therapy can have on a women’s health and well being, their intimate relationships and comfort during and after pregnancy.

 

What/who inspired you to become involved in pelvic rehabilitation?


Aug 20, 2014

This post was written by H&W instructor Ginger Garner, MPT, ATC, PYT. Ginger will be instructing the course that she wrote on "Yoga as Medicine for Pregnancy" in New York this November.

 

yoga

The power of language is inarguable. The spoken word affects how we see, perceive, and interpret the world around us. Language can also influence our actions and behavior, especially toward people around us.

The power of language in health care is not only important, but critical in prenatal health. The language a provider uses can help or harm a mother’s confidence and even her beliefs about birth.

 

Action to recognize and respond to the importance of language in general health care began with People First Language (PFL) movement. PFL advocates for mindful use of language that identifies the person first, rather than identifying the person based on their disability. Advocacy groups first started the movement for children’s sake. Mother’s who had given birth to children with Down’s syndrome wanted their children to be recognized as people first, rather than by their disability.


Aug 18, 2014

baby

According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 233,000 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed this year, and nearly 30,000 men will die from the disease. The diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the United States has experienced significant shifts in the past few years, making management of cancer survivors challenging.  One of the big changes in prostate cancer screening took place in 2011; the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended against routine prostate specific antigen, or PSA testing due to the level of potential harm such as psychological distress and complications from the biopsy. You can read a prior post about that here. New guidelines for providing care to prostate cancer survivors have been published by the American Cancer Society so that providers can better identify and manage the side effects and complications of the disease and recognize appropriate monitoring and screening of survivors. 

 

 

In patients younger than 65 years of age, radical prostatectomy surgery is the most common intervention for prostate cancer. Long-term side effects of radical prostatectomy commonly include, according to the guidelines, urinary and sexual dysfunction. Urinary incontinence or retention can occur following prostatectomy, and sexual issues can range from erectile dysfunction to changes in orgasm and even penile length. Other common treatments, such as radiation and androgen deprivation therapy, are also related to urinary, sexual, and bowel dysfunction, as well as a long list of "other" effects. 

 

 


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Upcoming Continuing Education Courses

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - St. Louis, MO (SOLD OUT!)
Sep 05, 2014 - Sep 07, 2014
Location: Washington University School of Medicine

Meditation and Pain Neuroscience - Winfield, IL
Sep 06, 2014 - Sep 07, 2014
Location: Central DuPage Hospital Conference Room

Visceral Mobilization Level Two - Boston, MA
Sep 12, 2014 - Sep 14, 2014
Location: Marathon Physical Therapy

Coccyx Pain - Nashua, NH
Sep 13, 2014 - Sep 14, 2014
Location: St. Joseph Hospital Rehabilitative Services

Visceral Mobilization of the Urologic System - Scottsdale, AZ
Sep 19, 2014 - Sep 21, 2014
Location: Womens Center for Wellness and Rehabilitation

Care of the Postpartum Patient - Maywood, IL
Sep 20, 2014 - Sep 21, 2014
Location: Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine

Pelvic Floor/ Pelvic Girdle - Atlanta, GA
Sep 27, 2014 - Sep 28, 2014
Location: One on One Physical Therapy

Assessing and Treating Vulvodynia - Waterford, CT
Sep 27, 2014 - Sep 28, 2014
Location: Visiting Nurses Association - Southeastern

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Durham, NC
Oct 03, 2014 - Oct 05, 2014
Location: Duke University Medical Center

Male Pelvic Floor - Tampa, FL
Oct 04, 2014 - Oct 05, 2014
Location: Florida Hospital - Wesley Chapel

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - St. Louis, MO (Sold Out!)
Oct 10, 2014 - Oct 12, 2014
Location: Washington University School of Medicine

Chronic Pelvic Pain - New Canaan, CT
Oct 10, 2014 - Oct 12, 2014
Location: Philip Physical Therapy

Peripartum Special Topics - Houston, TX
Oct 11, 2014 - Oct 12, 2014
Location: Texas Children’s Hospital

Pelvic Floor Level 3 - Maywood, IL
Oct 17, 2014 - Oct 19, 2014
Location: Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine

Lymphatic Drainage - San Diego, CA
Oct 18, 2014 - Oct 19, 2014
Location: FunctionSmart Physical Therapy