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Apr 10, 2014

 

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Research completed by medical faculty of Heidelberg University in Germany aimed to better understand the characteristics of pain that can be caused by different structures or tissues within the low back. Is the information gained applicable to all layers of tissues in the body? If so, how does that assist with our structural evaluation and interventions? If not, how do various body regions reflect the findings of this study?

 


Mar 31, 2014

 

Ramona C Horton, MPT

This post was written by guest blogger, H&W instructor Ramona Horton, MPT. Ramona teaches the Visceral Mobilization series of courses, as well as Myofascial Release for Pelvic Dysfunction course.


When I first began working as a pelvic floor PT in the early 90’s (the 1990’s that is), I spent a great deal of time marketing my program to physicians with less than stellar results. Sure, I got the odd referral here and there, but they were mostly the desperation patients that had run out of options. Not to be daunted by lack of success, I opted to present my message directly to the public; I took my “dog and pony show” on the road to senior health fairs, medical study groups and even civic organizations. Any group that was willing to put their comfort level aside and talk about their nether regions was fair game. Over time, the word got out to the physicians (mostly through their patients); our program grew and the need for marketing became a distant memory.


Mar 22, 2014

Brigid Ellingson, MPT, OCS

This blog post was written by faculty member Bridgid Ellingson, DPT, MPT, OCS, BCB-PMD. Bridgid is a private practice owner in the Chicago area and she is an instructor for the Institute's pelvic floor course series Level 2B course.


For years I resisted taking a physical therapy student into my clinic for their final rotation.  The traditional physical therapy curriculum does not adequately prepare a student for the experience and I do not believe that physical therapy for the pelvic floor is entry level work.  However, I recently had a particularly motivated student convince me to give it a try and I’d like to share my experience to help prepare other clinicians interested in taking students. 

 


Mar 05, 2014

In a study conducted in Western Sydney, Australia, researchers aimed to discover the barriers and enablers to attending preoperative pelvic floor muscle training for men scheduled for a radical prostatectomy. Semi-structured interviews were completed with referral sources (urological cancer surgeons, nurses, and general practitioners), pelvic rehabilitation providers (physical therapists and continence nurses), and male patients having surgery at a public and a private hospital. 

 

 

Key factors that encouraged men to attend pelvic muscle training included having a referral from a provider that was for a specific therapist or center. Barriers to attending rehabilitation included potential cost of private pelvic floor muscle training, and lack of awareness about pelvic muscle rehab among both providers and patients. The providers were often not aware of public sector providers of pelvic muscle training, and patients were unaware of potential benefits of rehabilitation. 

 


Feb 26, 2014

Ginger Garner

 

 

This blog was written by H&W course instructor Ginger Garner PT, MPT, ATC, PYT, who will be teaching her brand-new course, Extra-Articular Pelvic and Hip Labrum Injury: Differential Diagnosis and Integrative Management, in Akron, OH this June.




Feb 18, 2014

Fatima Hakeem, PT

 

This June, H&W is thrilled to be partnering with our dear friend, Fatima Hakeem, PT to bring a new course, The Business of Pelvic Rehab, to Denver, CO! This two-day course is intended for the clinician establishing or currently operating a women's health practice who would like to learn concrete skills for running his/her practice, including how to create a Business Plan, marketing to the community as well as physicians and hospital administrators, and recruiting and managing staff.


We sat down with Fatima to hear more about this great, new course.


Feb 14, 2014

 

 

 

sacrum

 


Feb 10, 2014

 

 

 

Throughout the Guidelines on Chronic Pelvic Pain created by the European Association of Urology, the recognition of anxiety and depression as a concomitant symptom of chronic pelvic pain is made. Various types of pelvic dysfunctions have been demonstrated to have an association with anxiety and depression, including urethral pain, chronic pelvic pain, anorectal disorders, and sexual dysfunction. While a first line of medical treatment for patients who complain of neuropathic pain type, according to the Guidelines, is the prescribing of antidepressants, there are other interventions identified in the literature for alleviating anxiety and stress related to chronic pain. One of the studied interventions for pain, anxiety, and stress is yoga


Feb 08, 2014

For patients who are diagnosed with constipation, functional anorectal testing is often completed prior to referral for physical therapy. A recent study concluded that clinical examination of pelvic floor muscle function is critical for identifying a rectocele or pelvic muscle overactivity, and that anorectal function tests should be reserved for selected cases. Pelvic rehabilitation therapists are able to perform tests of the pelvic muscles and function during a patient's attempts to contract, relax, and bear down through the pelvic floor. These tests are easy to repeat and a patient can be instructed in corrective muscle techniques to improve the ability to empty the bowels. 

 

 

Consider the patient who presents to the clinic after experiencing a defecography. In this test, a patient undergoes an imaging study while sitting on an elevated toilet seat. The patient is asked to bear down to evacuate a bolus of material that is placed inside the rectum. It is easy to understand why a patient finds this test to be "embarrassing." Following this test, when a patient is diagnosed with dyssynergia (when the puborectalis muscle contracts rather than lengthening and relaxing during attempt to defecate) he or she is frequently referred to pelvic rehabilitation. A pelvic rehab therapist can observe and palpate the same phenomena in the clinic: when asked to bear down or drop the pelvic floor muscles, if a patient instead contracts or is unable to lengthen the muscles, re-training can be implemented. 

 


Feb 06, 2014

Treating patients who have chronic pelvic pain is challenging for many reasons. The nature of chronic pain in any body site often means that the patient has a multifactorial presentation that requires a team approach to interventions. And because the pelvis also contains the termination of several body systems such as the urologic, reproductive, and gastrointestinal, there exists potential for addressing a musculoskeletal issue that is masking a medical issue which requires intervention by a medical provider. The phrase "When you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail" can be applied to patient care for any discipline. When a patient presents with chronic pelvic pain, pelvic rehabilitation therapists can usually find tender pelvic muscles to treat. Is the pelvic muscle tenderness from guarding due to visceral pain or infection? 

 

In a 2013 article in the journal General Practitioner, Dr Croton describes red flag symptoms in acute pelvic pain. These include pregnancy, pelvic or testicular masses, and vaginal bleeding and/or pain in postmenopausal women. During the history taking, patients can be asked about menstrual patterns, possibility of pregnancy, and sexual history. Further medical evaluation may include a pregnancy test, ultrasound, laparoscopy, and urine tests to rule out infection. While the above is not an exhaustive list, it reminds the pelvic rehabilitation provider to always keep in mind the potential for medical evaluation and intervention. Once a patient has been deemed to have "only chronic pelvic pain," a new, equally challenging list emerges: is the pain generated by an articular issue, myofascial dysfunction, neuropathy, psychological stress, or postural pattern? Is the pain local, such as in the pubis symphysis or in the sacroiliac joint ligaments, or are the symptoms referred from a nearby structure, such as the abdominal wall or the thoracolumbar junction? And what are the best methods to examine in a systematic way the various theories about the origins of a patient's pain? 

 

Peter Philip has created a course to provide answers to the above questions. He combines skills in both orthopedics and manual therapy, and pulls from an extensive knowledge about pelvic pain and differential diagnosis which was the research topic of his Doctor of Science degree. Peter's course provides clearly instructed techniques in anatomical palpation, spinal and joint assessment, and he also instructs in how the nervous system and cognition can impact a patient's perception of pain. The course will be offered at the end of this month in Seattle- don't miss this chance to refine skills in differential diagnosis for chronic pelvic pain!


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Upcoming Continuing Education Courses

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Durham, NC (SOLD OUT)
Apr 25, 2014 - Apr 27, 2014
Location: Duke University Medical Center

Myofascial Release for Pelvic Dysfunction - Portland, OR
Apr 25, 2014 - Apr 27, 2014
Location: Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center

Finding the Driver in Pelvic Pain - Milwaukee, WI
May 01, 2014 - May 03, 2014
Location: Marquette University

Visceral Mobilization of the Urologic System - Winfield, IL
May 02, 2014 - May 04, 2014
Location: Central DuPage Hospital Conference Room

Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging: Women's Health and Orthopedic Topics - Seattle, WA
May 03, 2014 - May 05, 2014
Location: Swedish Hospital - Issaquah campus

Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging Orthopedic Topics - Seattle, WA
May 03, 2014 - May 04, 2014
Location: Swedish Hospital - Issaquah campus

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Scottsdale, AZ (SOLD OUT)
May 16, 2014 - May 18, 2014
Location: Womens Center for Wellness and Rehabilitation

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - Maywood, IL (SOLD OUT!)
May 16, 2014 - May 18, 2014
Location: Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine

Pelvic Floor Level 3 - San Diego, CA
May 30, 2014 - Jun 01, 2014
Location: FunctionSmart Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Arlington, VA (SOLD OUT)
Jun 06, 2014 - Jun 08, 2014
Location: Virginia Hospital Center

Care of the Postpartum Patient - Houston, TX
Jun 07, 2014 - Jun 08, 2014
Location: Texas Children’s Hospital

Bowel Pathology and Function - Minneapolis, MN
Jun 07, 2014 - Jun 08, 2014
Location: Park Nicollet Clinic--St. Louis Park

Oncology and the Female Pelvic Floor - Orlando, FL
Jun 21, 2014 - Jun 22, 2014
Location: Florida Hospital Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation

Myofascial Release for Pelvic Dysfunction - Dayton, OH
Jun 22, 2014 - Jun 23, 2014
Location: Southview Hospital

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - Derby, CT
Jun 27, 2014 - Jun 29, 2014
Location: Griffin Hospital