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Mar 03, 2015

Blog by Holly Tanner

Although pelvic rehabilitation therapists are not directly involved in decision-making related to pharmacological pain management, knowledge of procedures and practice patterns related to perioperative pain management may be useful in communicating with the medical team and in understanding a patient's pain experiences related to surgery. A review article published in Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery highlights the pain management strategies described in the literature that are relevant for urogynecologic surgery. Brief descriptions of the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative pain control strategies are discussed in this study, and the following recommendations are made:

 

-Multimodal analgesic approaches should be considered for all procedures because the use of several interventions (with varied mechanisms of action) can reduce postoperative pain, reduce opioid use and opioid-related side effects. Medications for potential use in a multimodal approach include perioperative paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), dexamethasone, and local anesthetics.

 

-For patients having abdominal urogynecologic procedures, bilateral TAP blocks are recommended. A TAP block is short for transversus abdominis plane block, and aims to numb the sensory afferent nerves of the anterior abdominal wall running superficial to the transversus abdominis muscle. For the procedure, a needle is placed into the area created within the margins of the superior iliac crest, the latissimus dorsi muscle, and the external oblique muscle. The needle placement can be done by palpation or with ultrasound guidance.

 


Mar 02, 2015

In our weekly feature section, Pelvic Rehab Report is proud to present this interview with Herman & Wallace instructor Tina Allen, PT, BCB-PMD, PRPC

 

Tina Allen

How did you get started in pelvic rehab?

I was about 5 years into my career as a PT when for some reason I had patients who where comfortable with me enough to ask questions like, "I'm leaking. Is that normal after giving birth?", "Since my total hip replacement I've been leaking urine" and "I have pain sometimes when I'm have sex...is that normal?". I was working in Outpatient Orthopaedics and I had no idea if it was normal. I searched and found out that it wasn't. After whispering to my patients that it wasn't normal, that I read that there where things they could do about it and then slipping them pieces of paper with instructions on how to maybe make it better; I decided I should learn if there was something a PT could do to help. I spent time with Ob/Gyn's and Urologists learning from them and applying my musculoskelatal knowledge to what they taught me. I was still in denial that I could help folks but then I started getting patients specifically referred to me for these conditions. I finally found that there where classes I could take! Imagine! That was 20 years ago now!

 

Who or what inspired you?


Feb 27, 2015

Blog by Holly Tanner

A US study published in the International Society for Sexual Medicine last year reports on the available evidence linking cycling to female sexual dysfunction. In the article, some of the study results are summarized in the left column of the chart below. On the right side of the column, we can consider ideas about how to potentially address these issues.

 

 


 

Examples of Research Cited
Ideas for Addressing Potential for Harm
dropped handlebar position increases pressure on the perineum and can decrease genital sensation encourage cyclists to take breaks from dropped position, either by standing up or by moving out of drops temporarily
chronic trauma can cause clitoral injury encourage cyclists to wear appropriately padded clothing, to apply cooling to decrease inflammation, and to use quality shocks or move out of the saddle when going over rough roads/terrain when able
saddle loading differs between men and women women should consider specific fit for bike saddles
women have greater anterior pelvic tilt motion is pelvic motion on bike demonstrating adequate stability of pelvis or is there a lot of extra motion and rocking occurring?
lymphatics can be harmed from frequent infections and from groin compression patients should be instructed in positions of relief from compression and in self-lymphatic drainage
pressure in the perineal area is affected by saddle design, shape female cyclists with concerns about perineal health should work with a therapist or bike expert who is knowledgeable about a variety of products and fit issues
unilateral vulvar enlargement can occur from biomechanics factors therapists should evaluate vulvar area for size, swelling, and evidence of imbalances in the tissues from side to side, and evaluate bike fit and mechanics, encouraging women to create more symmetry of limb use
genital sensation is frequently affected in cyclists, indicating dysfunction in pudendal nerve therapists should evaluate female cyclists for sensory or motor loss, establishing a baseline for re-evaluation

Because women tend to be more comfortable in an upright position, the authors recommend that a recreational (more upright) versus a competitive (more aerodynamic and forward leaning) position may be helpful for women when appropriate. Although saddles with nose cut-outs and other adaptations such as gel padding in seats are discussed in the article, the authors caution against making any distinct recommendations due to the paucity of literature that is available. The paper concludes that more research is needed, and particularly for considering the varied populations of riders ranging from recreational to racing.

 


Feb 26, 2015

This post was written by H&W instructor Ginger Garner. Ginger will be presenting her Hip Labrum Injuries course in Houston in March!

 

Ginger Garner

Lots of you have reached out with questions about “best care” practices after hip surgery. There isn’t a whole lot in scientific literature written about rehab, and over many months of fielding questions on my closed HIP LABRAL PHYSIOTHERAPY FB page, I am finally ready to share what Best Care Practices after Hip Labral Surgery may look like.

 

Today is Post 1 of this series, which will follow me day-by-day, week-by-week, through the highs and lows of my recovery and rehabilitation. Here we go!

 


Feb 25, 2015

Blog by Holly Tanner

An important survey completed in Australia asked if prenatal pelvic floor function and dysfunction relates to postnatal pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). Interestingly, the authors propose that "…damage to the pelvic floor is probably made before first pregnancy due to congenital intrinsic weakness of pelvic floor structures." Many of the patients involved in the study had dysfunction in more than one domain of pelvic health, with the authors recommending a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of pelvic floor dysfunction.

 

As part of the large study called the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints study, or SCOPE, a prospective cohort study called Prevalence and Predictors of Pelvic floor dysfunction in Prenips, or 4P, was also completed. The 4P research (n = 858) contained 2 different studies including a questionnaire-based survey and a detailed clinical assessment. The survey utilized the Australian pelvic floor questionnaire which was administered at 15 weeks gestation and at 1 year postpartum. The Australian questionnaire scores items on domains of urinary dysfunction, fecal dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse, and sexual dysfunction. When the participants answered the questionnaire the first time, all answers were directed to be answered for symptoms they experienced prior to being pregnant.

 

The results indicated that at 1 year postpartum, 90% of the women in this study reported pelvic floor dysfunction. Regarding the domains of bladder, bowel, prolapse and sexual symptoms, 71% of the participants reported symptoms from more than 1 of these domains, 31% from 2 domains, 24% from 3 sections of the survey, and 8% from all four sections. Other interesting statistics are as follows:

 


Feb 24, 2015

Blog by Holly Tanner

Results from a national survey of surgeons published in 2010 offers insights into the challenges that providers and patients face in addressing the complications caused by post-surgical adhesions. The survey included 55 multiple-choice questions, four open-ended questions, and four optional questions. The questions were posed to Dutch surgeons and trainees and included information about awareness of adhesions, use of anti-adhesive agents in surgery, informed consent, and benefits versus risks of adhesions. The survey also included items with "correct" answers containing data from evidence-based information about post-surgical adhesions including the following:

-postoperative adhesions are the cause of 70% of small-bowel obstructions-there is a 5% readmission rate after colorectal surgery related to postoperative adhesions

-there is approximately a 30% readmission rate following abdominal surgery due to adhesions

-adhesiolysis poses a 20% risk of accidental enterotomy

-a colonic total resection has highest rate of adhesion-related morbidity compared with partial small-bowel resection, appendectomy, or rectal resection

-being older than 60 is associated with less adhesions


Feb 23, 2015

Today the Pelvic Rehab Report caught up with instructors Bill Gallagher PT, CMT, CYT and Richard Sabel MA, MPH, OTR, GCFP to talk about their Integrative Techniques for Pelvic Floor & Core Function: Weaving Yoga, Tai Chi, Qigong, Feldenkrais and Conventional Therapies course being presented in Boston, MA this March 28 – 29. Check out their discussion of these awesome treatment techniques, including a free exercise regimen!

 

Bill Gallagher

Richard Sabel

Resurrecting the Dead Zone

When considering the board range of health issues that fall under the umbrella of pelvic dysfunction, we’ve observed that too many of our clients have PPA - poor pelvic awareness. Sure they’re cognizant of the pain, discomfort or distress associated with their particular issue, but in reality the pelvic region is, as Imgard Bartenieff described it, “the dead seven inches in most Americans’ bodies.” We’ve taken creative license here and call it “the dead zone.”

 


Feb 20, 2015

In our weekly feature section, Pelvic Rehab Report is proud to present this interview with newly certified practitioner Jaime Sepulveda, MD, PRPC.

 

Jaime Sepulveda

Describe your clinic practice:

I would describe my practice as female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery. I treat urinary and fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, bladder pain syndromes, recurrent urinary tract infections and dysfunctional disorders of the bowel and bladder.

 

How did you get involved in the pelvic rehabilitation field?


Feb 19, 2015

Prolapse Bladder

When considering rehabilitation of prolapse symptoms, therapists often implement an approach that addresses multiple factors related to pelvic health and function. Rehabilitation of prolapse symptoms may include bladder re-training, pelvic muscle strengthening, bowel health management, trunk and pelvic control strategies, avoidance of potential aggravating maneuvers such as bearing down, and education in management tools such as pessaries. As we have established in earlier posts in this 3-part series, each patient must be evaluated and treated with respect to her complaints and clinical findings. This post highlights a few of the many clinical research studies aimed at determining effectiveness of pelvic rehabilitation for prolapse symptoms.

 

In recent research, Hagen and colleagues completed a multi-center, randomized trial using parallel treatment groups to assess recovery from prolapse. Women with a stage I-III prolapse of any type confirmed by a physician using the POP-Q system and complaints of prolapse symptoms were the primary inclusion criteria. Women who had previously been treated by surgery for prolapse were excluded. The control group (n = 222) were given a prolapse lifestyle advice leaflet and no pelvic floor muscle training. The lifestyle advice included information about weight loss, constipation, avoidance of heavy lifting, coughing, and high-impact exercise. No information about pelvic floor muscle exercise was included.

 

The physiotherapy treatment group (n = 225) received up to 5 individualized sessions of pelvic floor muscle training over 16 weeks. The first appointments were scheduled closer together to allow for proper training in muscle education, with the latter appointments being spread further apart. Rehabilitation began with instruction in pelvic muscle anatomy and function. Exercises were instructed based on results of a pelvic muscle assessment, and exercises were progressed with a goal of up to 10, 10-second holds, and up to 50 quick contractions completed three times per day. Women were also instructed in a pre-contraction of the pelvic floor muscles prior to increases in intra-abdominal pressure. (Electromyography, electrical stimulation, or pressure biofeedback were not allowed among the interventions.)

 


Feb 18, 2015

This post was written by H&W founder and instructor Hollis Herman, DPT OCS WCS BCB-PMD IF AASECT PRPC, who authored and instructs the course, Sexual Medicine for Men and Women. She will be presenting this course this April in New Jersey!

 

Hollis Herman

This course is perfect to help you, the healthcare professional, feel comfortable and knowledgeable about all sorts of sexual issues. The course is fun, interesting and unlike any other you have taken.It has three parts.

 

Part 1: The first part is designed to help you get in touch with your attitudes, beliefs, values and biases regarding sexual function. There are questionnaires to fill out and bring with you to the course, movies to watch, and books to read. These questionnaires, movies, videos and books will bring up sexual subject matter, questions, images and ideas that may be controversial to you. You will be exposed to many variations in sexual activity and asked about your reactions, sexual development, upbringing, feelings and worries you may carry around.

 


Upcoming Continuing Education Courses

Special Topics in Women's Health - Maywood, IL
May 30, 2015 - May 31, 2015
Location: Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine

Sacroiliac Joint Evaluation and Treatment - Middletown, CT
May 30, 2015 - May 31, 2015
Location: Middlesex Hospital

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Seattle, WA (Sold Out!)
Jun 05, 2015 - Jun 07, 2015
Location: Swedish Medical Center Seattle - Ballard Campus

Pelvic Floor Level 3 - Atlanta, GA
Jun 05, 2015 - Jun 07, 2015
Location: One on One Physical Therapy

Visceral Mobilization of the Urologic System - Madison, WI
Jun 05, 2015 - Jun 07, 2015
Location: Meriter Hospital

Nutritional Perspectives for the Pelvic Rehab Therapist - Seattle, WA
Jun 06, 2015 - Jun 07, 2015
Location: Pacific Medical Center

Rehabilitative Ultra Sound Imaging: Orthopedic Topics - Baltimore, MD
Jun 12, 2015 - Jun 13, 2015
Location: Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center

Rehabilitative Ultra Sound Imaging: Women's Health and Orthopedic Topics - Baltimore, MD
Jun 12, 2015 - Jun 14, 2015
Location: Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Boston, MA (SOLD OUT!)
Jun 12, 2015 - Jun 14, 2015
Location: Marathon Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Derby, CT (SOLD OUT)
Jun 26, 2015 - Jun 28, 2015
Location: Griffin Hospital

Breast Oncology - Maywood, IL
Jun 27, 2015 - Jun 28, 2015
Location: Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine

Chronic Pelvic Pain - Arlington, VA
Jul 10, 2015 - Jul 12, 2015
Location: Virginia Hospital Center

Myofascial Release for Pelvic Dysfunction - Winfield, IL
Jul 17, 2015 - Jul 19, 2015
Location: Central DuPage Hospital Conference Room

Pediatric Incontinence - Houston, TX
Jul 18, 2015 - Jul 19, 2015
Location: Texas Children’s Hospital

Yoga for Pelvic Pain - Cleveland, OH
Jul 18, 2015 - Jul 19, 2015
Location: UH Case Medical Center - University Hospitals