(646) 355-8777
  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
Blog posts tagged in Demographic Trends

What are the attributes and barriers to care for college-aged women who have pelvic pain? This is a question asked by researchers who published an original article on the topic in the Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. To complete the study, a random sample of 2000 female students at the University of Florida were sent an online questionnaire. Included in the questionnaire was basic demographic data, general health and health behavior questions, psychosocial factors, measures assessing different types of pelvic pain such as dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, urinary, bowel, or vulvar pain, and information about barriers to care for pelvic pain and quality of life measures. A total of 390 women completed the survey, and the mean age was 23 years old. Most of the women in the sample identified as white, with 9.6% identifying as black or African-American. Most of the respondents had never been pregnant. The chart below lists some of the data.

Experienced pelvic pain over past 12 months 73%
Dysmenorrhea 80%
Deep dyspareunia 30%
Symptoms with bowel movements 38%
Vulvar pain (including superficial dyspareunia) 21.5%
Of women with pelvic pain, those lacking diagnosis 79%
Of women with pelvic pain, those who have not visited doctor 74%

Barriers to receiving care included difficulty with insurance coverage and providers’ “…lack of time and knowledge or interest in chronic pelvic pain conditions.” An interesting finding was that among the women who had pelvic pain, those who were sexually active reported lower scores on physical and mental health. Even among the women without pelvic pain, those who were sexually active reported lower mental health scores.

Recently in the Pelvic Rehab Report blog we discussed the beneficial role of pelvic rehabilitation for symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Additional research was published this year that supports the use of pranayama for improving quality of life and pain in girls with primary dysmenorrhea. Breathing within yoga studies is a rich field, with well-defined variations in stages and kinds of breathing, techniques and postures, and use of different hand positions and breathing through the nostrils and/or mouth. The Oxford online dictionary defines pranayama as a practice coming from Hindu yoga and related to regulating the breath through specific techniques.

Pranayama

In the study, the practice of both slow pranayama (Nadi Shodhan) and fast pranayama (Kapalbhati) was instructed to the women to be completed in the mornings on an empty stomach for 10 minutes per day. Ninety unmarried young women (ages 18-25) diagnosed with primary dysmenorrhea were randomly and equally assigned to either Group A (slow pranayama) or Group B (fast pranayama). Outcomes included the Moos menstrual distress questionnaire (MMDQ), numerical pain rating pain scale, a quality of life scale "by American chronic pain association" and the assessments were administered at baseline, after the first menstrual cycle, and after the second menstrual cycle. To read more details about the methods and results, the full article can be accessed here.

Upcoming Continuing Education Courses

Feb 26, 2016 - Feb 28, 2016
Location: Evergreen Hospital Medical Center

Mar 4, 2016 - Mar 6, 2016
Location: Comprehensive Therapy Services

Mar 5, 2016 - Mar 6, 2016
Location: St. Luke’s Hospital Rehab Services

Mar 6, 2016 - Mar 8, 2016
Location: Touro College: Bayshore

Mar 11, 2016 - Mar 13, 2016
Location: Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital

Mar 12, 2016 - Mar 13, 2016
Location: Pacific Medical Center

Mar 12, 2016 - Mar 13, 2016
Location: Texas Children’s Hospital

Mar 18, 2016 - Mar 20, 2016
Location: The George Washington University

Mar 19, 2016 - Mar 20, 2016
Location: One on One Physical Therapy

Mar 19, 2016 - Mar 20, 2016
Location: Mercy Hospital

Apr 1, 2016 - Apr 3, 2016
Location: Marathon Physical Therapy

Apr 1, 2016 - Apr 3, 2016
Location: Mercy Hospital

Apr 2, 2016 - Apr 3, 2016
Location: Anne Arundel Medical Center

Apr 2, 2016 - Apr 3, 2016
Location: Florida Hospital - Wesley Chapel

Apr 8, 2016 - Apr 10, 2016
Location: CentraState Medical Center

Apr 8, 2016 - Apr 10, 2016
Location: Meriter Hospital

Apr 15, 2016 - Apr 17, 2016
Location: Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine

Apr 16, 2016 - Apr 17, 2016
Location: Doctors Hospital Pelvic Health Institute

Apr 16, 2016 - Apr 17, 2016
Location: Kima - Center for Physiotherapy & Wellness

Apr 22, 2016 - Apr 24, 2016
Location: Providence St. Josephs Medical Center

Apr 23, 2016 - Apr 24, 2016
Location: The George Washington University

Apr 23, 2016 - Apr 24, 2016
Location: Mizzou Physical Therapy-Rangeline

Apr 29, 2016 - May 1, 2016
Location: Duke University Medical Center

Apr 30, 2016 - May 1, 2016
Location: Sports Medicine Institute

May 1, 2016 - May 3, 2016
Location: Southview Hospital

May 1, 2016 - May 2, 2016
Location: Southview Hospital

May 13, 2016 - May 15, 2016
Location: Isanti Physical Therapy

May 14, 2016 - May 15, 2016
Location: Inova Alexandria Hospital

May 21, 2016 - May 22, 2016
Location: Seton Healthcare Center

May 21, 2016 - May 22, 2016
Location: Unity at Ridgeway Physical Therapy