(646) 355-8777

Bring Mindfulness into Your Practice with Restorative Yoga - A Short Interview with Kate Bailey

SITH Kate Bailey

This week, faculty member Kate Bailey sat down with Holly Tanner to discuss her course Restorative Yoga for Physical Therapists.

 

Hi Kate, can you tell us about the course you have designed Restorative Yoga for Physical Therapists?

My name is Kate Bailey and I am a pelvic floor physical therapist. I’ve been a pelvic floor PT going on4-5 years now.  Before that, I’ve been a pilates instructor for 20 years and taught yoga for over a decade. This course is a culmination of all of my experiences both with the yoga, pilates, and the pelvic floor population from kiddos through adulthood. It allows us to use the techniques from the yoga and pilates philosophies to support people in their healing process from pelvic pain and also just in their bodies.

What can participants expect to learn when they come to the course?

I wrote this course when the pandemic started. My whole intention was to make the didactic information self-paced and watch the videos as often as you want kind of course. This way, when we have dedicated time together it’s a lot more about discussion and me guiding people through the labs, and in turn, they can guide their colleagues or patients. It is designed so I’m not spending a lot of time lecturing to a screen and our time dedicated to each other is more about a conversation.  I want people to learn about the information in their own time, marinate in it a little bit, and then come with questions.

How do you feel that restorative yoga fits in with the care we provide to our patients with pelvic health conditions?

The restorative yoga component to me is really special because it’s one of the only times we prioritize rest, and not doing, and sitting with ourselves. Not necessarily trying to get strong, or trying to get more flexible. It’s really about allowing our bodies to be. Sometimes that is being in a little bit of discomfort. Sometimes that is just being with the exhaustion that I think we all have a little bit of. Just learning how to be with ourselves for 8, to 12, to 15 minutes and see that as a really productive part of our treatment plan.

How does trauma-informed care influence your course?

One of the things that I highlight in the course is how much trauma occurs in and around the home. So when we’re asking patients to do a home program one of the discussion points we have in the course is “what if the home is inherently triggering or unsafe?” How can we use concepts of graded exposure to get someone from needing a lot of sensory things, like lights on, windows locked, facing the window, eyes open to slowly getting people toward a little bit more safety. If that is not a possibility, finding another location and strategizing how we can prioritize our own safety and our own ability to relax rather than saying I must relax.

The other component of trauma in the course is the unveiling of how prevalent trauma is. In pelvic health, we talk a lot about sexual trauma because we are dealing a lot with the pelvic floor region and the genitals. One of the things I think we sometimes might be able to speak to more is the little subversive types of trauma. Whether it is emotional trauma, whether it is neglect, whether it is transgenerational trauma or intersectionality trauma…

There’s this other component in yoga that is coming out now that is the trauma that has been handed down through the yoga lineages. What I think is not understood is that a lot of people who practice yoga in a deep way have significant trauma from yoga. The question then is how do we reclaim a practice that is so lovely, done with care and kindness and non harming, for people who have maybe experienced it in a very harmful way – and introduce it as a non-harming, caring, compassionate method for people who haven’t experienced it. The whole idea is about how do you be in rest in your body and in empowerment.

Can you give an example of how a pelvic PT or OT would fit restorative yoga into their practice?

As PTs and Ots we are starting to bring mindfulness in, a lot, to our programming in terms of some of the work from Jon Kabat Zen on how great meditation is for so many things. There is still a question of “How do I put this in my plan of care?” The great thing about this class is that we can speak directly to this. Let's say that you are in a hospital-based scenario, you can give restorative yoga to someone n a hospital bed very easily. They’re not going anywhere and what a great thing to give them: a breathing practice, a concentration practice, and a rest practice.

For someone in private practice, such as orthopedics, this is the type of practice where maybe you’re not giving pelvic floor strengthening if someone has a large degree of overactivity in their pelvic floor. But they still need something to do at home, or they need something to do at the office. Maybe restorative yoga is a little bit too far out there for the patient. Maybe they don’t have a space they can lie down on the floor. That’s when we can say, ok how can we then transfer a pelvic floor restorative yoga posture to a desk situation? Can you cross your legs on your chair and lean forward, and modify it that way.

Then there is this component of the class that is all about breathing.  I think we know in pelvic health how wonderful and how great breath-work can be and so some of these techniques can be used as ‘secret exercises’ in your everyday life in addition to being a dedicated practice. We talk about all of that in class.


Watch the full interview with Kate Bailey at the Herman & Wallace YouTube Channel:

Join Kate to learn more about including restorative yoga into your practice with Restorative Yoga for Physical Therapists this year. Courses are scheduled for:

Special Considerations for Pregnant and Postpartum...
Restorative Yoga for Physical Therapists

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://hermanwallace.com/

All Upcoming Continuing Education Courses