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Faculty members Jenni Gabelsberg DPT, WCS, MSc, MTC and Jennafer Vande Vegte, PT, BCB-PMD, PRPC along with senior Teaching Assistant Quozette Valera PT, DPT will travel to Africa to teach pelvic health in Nairobi City, Kenya through a partnership between Herman & Wallace and The Jackson Foundation. These instructors will be teaching two modules of comprehensive pelvic health training with the goal of creating a self-sustaining, continuous education program taught and offered locally. In addition to training a cohort of physiotherapists in assessing and treating the pelvic floor, these American faculty members will be mentoring local Kenyan therapists to teach these courses in an ongoing manner. We at the Institute are proud and thrilled to be a part of spreading this knowledge and skillset in this currently-underserved region.

The courses offered will comprise H&W's Pelvic Floor Series, with the addition of content relevant to Kenya, including obstetric fistula and female genital mutilation. According to the Worldwide Fistula Fund, there are ~ 2 million women and girls suffering from fistulas. Estimates range from 30 to 100 thousand new cases developing each year; 3-5 cases/1000 pregnancies in low-income countries. A woman may suffer for 1-9 years before seeking treatment. For women who develop fistula in their first pregnancy, 70% end up with no living children.


Have you ever had a dream hidden so deep in your heart you never even spoke it aloud?

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I will never forget when my sister, my bestie, told me she wanted to end her life. We were on the phone late one night, tears flowing. Depression was always a companion, but I had never heard her in such a state of despair. We made a plan that she would call the suicide hotline, then call her therapist and her doctor in the morning for urgent care. She made it through the night. Later, I went to her therapist with her so I could better understand and support my sister. She did her due diligence, adjusting medication and staying open and honest in therapy. Suicidal ideations would sometimes flare when there were triggers, but she was able to work through them, and now they are in the past.

Contrast that story with another. Ryan was a sweet woman who developed pudendal neuralgia after a routine hysterectomy. Right away, she told me she had a counselor who she loved who helped her navigate life with DID (Dissociative Identity Disorder) and that I’d probably be interacting with various personalities during our sessions. She helped me understand how to best support her during her care. We worked well together, and although she struggled with both the pain and the unfairness of what happened to her, she was well supported. Then her sweet dog passed away. It was so hard for her. She kept going through pain and heartache and found another pooch to adopt. And then the next visit, she didn’t show. And the next, and the next. And then I found out she was gone. Suicide. This hit me hard. Were there signs that I missed? Was there anything I could have done?

As pelvic rehab providers, we sometimes see people who have intense physical pain often combined with significant emotional wounds. In a study of 713 women seeking support for pelvic pain, 46.8 reported having sexual or physical abuse history, and 31.3 were positive for PTSD (1).

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vaginal pH

 

Many years ago a urology doctor shared the skill of testing vaginal pH as part of my pelvic floor exam.  I’ve since used it to gather objective data around estrogen status, often finding elevated levels in post-partum, breastfeeding, and peri and post-menopausal women. When correlated with symptoms and visual skin changes this can be a helpful tool to both direct treatment and monitor treatment effectiveness. 

To perform pH testing, place a pH strip into the distal vagina. Let it sit there for a few seconds to absorb vaginal moisture. Remove and record results. Any concerning changes in vaginal pH can be documented and reported back to your patient’s medical provider.

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A Weekend of Transformation

Let me start this plog (picture/blog?) by saying it had been almost 2 years since Nari Clemons and I taught Boundaries, Self Care, and Meditation for the first time. Nari had some amazing ideas to change some of the course material to reflect more of our hearts’ intention for personal reflection and transformative change. We were excited and nervous to see how our second run of this material would be received. We were also profoundly aware of how the (at times painful) events in our lives that led up to the development of the course have molded and shaped us into much healthier versions of ourselves. We wanted to share a bit about what we have learned and how it has changed us.

We met up in beautiful San Diego on Thursday. Because this course was Saturday to Mononday we had an added bonus of extra time to spend together. We decided to spend our time practicing what we talk about in class.

1. Get out in nature:

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This is part three of a three-part series on self-care and preventing practitioner burnout from faculty member Jennafer Vande Vegte, MSPT, BCB-PMD, PRPC. Part One and Part Two are previously published. Jennafer is the co-author and co-instructor of the Boundaries, Self Care, and Meditation course along with Nari Clemons, PT, PRPC.

Part 3: Carefully Choosing to Say Yes or No (or The Summer that Almost Wasn’t)

*Disclaimer: this essay is meant to be read in a voice of complete transparency and humility.

Two summers ago I was anxiously anticipating a break. I was wrapping up home school for my girls and had scheduled some down time from writing my contribution to “Boundaries, Meditation and Self-Care” when I got the call…

Rewind a bit. Two years prior I also got a call. Would I be interested in writing a chapter in a Urology textbook on alternative care for pelvic pain conditions…edited by and partnering with a big name in pelvic floor rehab? Oh yes indeed I would! I have always dreamed of seeing my name in print. Was I scared out of my mind? Heck yes! I was working 20 hours a week, part time home schooling my girls and teaching for Herman & Wallace. I had one day a week to myself for cleaning, errands, the occasional book reading or interacting with friends. I decided I could spend my next year of Fridays researching, writing and editing said chapter. Oh, I also started therapy for the anxiety increase that came with the project. My therapist suggested I hire help with house cleaning, which I did. She also suggested meditation, mindfulness and using essential oils. I opted not to enact these suggestions. It was a crazy year, but I learned a ton and was proud of my contribution to the publication.

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Jennafer Vande Vegte, MSPT, BCB-PMD, PRPC

Part 2: The Drama Triangle

This is part two of a three-part series on self-care and preventing practitioner burnout from faculty member Jennafer Vande Vegte, MSPT, BCB-PMD, PRPC. Part One is available here. Jennafer is the co-author and co-instructor of the along with Nari Clemons, PT, PRPC.

Augh, I was so frustrated with myself. I fell for it again. Here’s the scenario: a patient came in suffering excruciating pain. She had been to see a pelvic health professional as well as various medical professionals and was unable to get relief and answers for her rectal pain. She was desperate and called me “her last hope.” Phrases used included, “I need you! Fix me! I hear you are a miracle worker! If you can’t help me no one can!” And just like that I took on the role of Rescuer.

In 1968 a psychiatrist named Stephen Karpman developed a model of personal interaction that he called the Conflict Triangle. It has also become known as the Karpman Triangle, The Drama triangle or the Victim triangle. Per Wikipedia:

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The following is the first in a series on self-care and preventing practitioner burnout from faculty member Jennafer Vande Vegte, MSPT, BCB-PMD, PRPC. Jennafer is the co-author and co-instructor of the Boundaries, Self-Care, and Meditation course along with Nari Clemons, PT, PRPC.

Part 1: Boundaries

“I just want you to fix me.” How many times have we heard this statement from our patients? And how do we respond? In my former life as a “rescuer” this statement would be a personal challenge. I wanted to be the fixer, find the solution and identify the thing that no one else had seen yet. Then, if I am being completely honest, bask in the glory of being the “miracle worker” and “never giving up” on my patient.

If you recognize that this attitude was going to run me into some problems, kudos to you. If you are thinking, “well of course, isn’t that your job as a pelvic floor physical therapist?” Please read on.

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While my dad was visiting Michigan, we had the day to ourselves as my kids were in school. I was so excited to have quality time with my dad. Unfortunately it was pouring down rain. We decided on a leisurely brunch and then a movie. Dad chose the movie, “Wind River.” While not a movie I would normally pick, I was happy to go along. A little more than half way through…there was a horribly violent scene against a young women. I panicked, plugged my ears and closed my eyes. Unfortunately some images were burned into the back of my mind. When the movie was over, I remained seated and tears just came. My dad held me while I cried. I was able to calm down and leave the theater, but the images continued to bother me. During the next few days, I made it a priority to care for myself and allow my nervous system to process and heal.

What happened to me? I have never had any traumatic personal experience. Why did I react so strongly? I talked with my therapist about it and she suggested I might have experienced secondary traumatic stress. We know, as pelvic health therapists, we need extra time to hear the “stories” of new patients. We do our best to create a safe space for them so they can trust us and we can help them discover pathways to healing. Yet no one has taught us what we are supposed to do with the traumatic stories our patients share. How are we to cope with holding space for their pain? How do we put on a happy face as we exit the room to get the next patient?

Teaching Capstone over the last few years, Nari Clemons and I have talked with many of you who were feeling emotionally overloaded especially when treating chronic pelvic pain and trauma survivors. Some of you were experiencing job burnout, others were deciding maybe it was time for a career shift, away from the pelvis. We realized something needed to be done as our field was losing talented pelvic health therapists. We have also struggled ourselves with various aspects of our profession.

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Today we pick up on Jennafer Vande Vegte's interview with her patient, "Ben", about his experience overcoming chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Ben's quality of life improved so much that he has returned to school in order to become a PTA, with a focus on pelvic rehabilitation!

 

Describe your physical therapy experience. Talk about your recovery process. Include the physical, mental and emotional components.

For my initial visit, my therapist questioned and assessed my pain, then explained pelvic floor dysfunction. She made sure I understood that the evaluation and treatment process involved internal rectal work. After developing the condition and months of seeing doctors who didn’t listen, finally I found a physical therapist who was actually listening to me and determined to get to the bottom of what was going on. I could tell she already knew much about the mechanics (if not the exact cause) because she had treated other patients with the same issues. I immediately sensed a difference from any other health care professional in attitude, compassion, and knowledge. Of course, how do you know for sure? Well, you don’t. But after repeated visits and excellent results, you experience the difference. An important realization while going to Physical Therapy is learning to see the mind-body connection. In the back of my mind I sensed that my pain was being perpetuated by emotional trauma. This is not an intuitive way of thinking when you are in constant high-level, 5-alarm pain. I was obsessed with finding the cause of my pain, but chronic pain is extremely elusive and complicated.

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Recently my coworkers and I celebrated a male patient’s recovery from a long and difficult journey with persistent pelvic pain.  “Ben’s” case had many elements of what we normally see in our patients: chronic muscle holding, restricted fascia, allodynia, hyperalgesia, castrophizing and kenisiophobia.  Ben was also very upfront about how his pain impacted his emotional well-being and vice versa.  His healing process taught us a lot about the biopsychosocial aspects of treating persistent pain.  Along his journey we dreamed of the day we could write a blog together and help other people learn from the experience. Ben also decided to make a career change entering school to become a PTA so that he could help others in pain. Here is my interview with this brave patient.

1.   Tell us about how your pain started
 
My pain started with urethral burning.  Tests showed there was no infection.  In retrospect, the cause of pain could have been the beginning of tension on pudendal nerve branches from extreme stress and a series of traumatic incidents that happened within weeks of each other.  They included a very embarrassing and stressful summer of unemployment, a father who had heart failure and triple bypass in the fall, and a girlfriend who gave me an ultimatum when I was too stressed to get an erection.

2.   What medical tests or treatments were done?
When the pain started, I first thought it was a basic urinary tract infection.  I went to the med center and was prescribed an antibiotic.  After 3 days without change, I went back in and although they still found no sign of infection, they prescribed an additional antibiotic.  The urethral pain never stopped and seemed to get worse.  Following a series of visits to numerous doctors and urologists, I repeated tests on the prostate fluid, blood tests, and more bacterial tests.  No infection.  My PCP also made a fairly large overture of testing me repeatedly for HIV.  For five months I had a blood test every month, all came back negative.  This was damaging to my psyche. For those months I was terrified my life was over.  In retrospect, that doctor was out of line, I changed doctors.

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Upcoming Continuing Education Courses

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Self-Hosted

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - New York City, NY Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: KNOSIS Center for Physiotherapy & Wellness

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Birmingham, AL Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: TherapySouth

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Kirkland, WA Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Evergreen Health

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Virginia Beach, VA Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Ivy Rehab (Virginia Beach, VA)

Male Pelvic Floor - Shelby, NC Satellite Location

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Ivy Rehab Physical Therapy (Shelby, NC)

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Des Plaines, IL Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Team Rehabilitation (Des Plaines)

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Cranford, NJ Satellite Location

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Ivy Rehab Physical Therapy (Cranford, NJ)

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Kerrville, TX Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Peterson Regional Medical Center

Male Pelvic Floor - Las Vegas, NV Satellite Location

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Action Therapeutics LLC

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Torrance, CA Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Women's Advantage Inc

Male Pelvic Floor - Self-Hosted

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Syracuse, NY Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Onondaga Physical Therapy

Restorative Yoga for Physical Therapists - Remote Course

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Salt Lake City, UT Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Utah Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Decatur, GA Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Kemper Pelvic Physiotherapy

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Chico, CA Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Jan 22, 2022 - Jan 23, 2022
Location: Enloe Rehabilitation Center

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Annapolis, MD Satellite Course (SOLD OUT)

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Lynch Physical Therapy

Oncology of the Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Remote Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Postpartum Rehabilitation - Remote Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Tampa, FL Satellite Course (SOLD OUT)

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Bloom Pelvic Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Lansdale, PA Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Ivy Rehab (Lansdale, PA)

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Shelby, NC Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Ivy Rehab Physical Therapy (Shelby, NC)

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - El Paso, TX Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Border Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Tullahoma, TN Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: TOP Rehab

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - South Jordan, UT Satellite Course

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: South Jordan Health Center

Pelvic Floor Level 2B - Self-Hosted

Jan 29, 2022 - Jan 30, 2022
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Coccydynia and Painful Sitting - Remote Course

Feb 4, 2022
Location: Short Form Remote Course

Athletes & Pelvic Rehabilitation - Remote Course

Feb 5, 2022 - Feb 6, 2022
Location: Replacement Remote Course