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Herman & Wallace Blog

Department of Education's Changes to Title IX

Last week- on May 6 amid a pandemic- the Department of Education released changes to Title IX. Title IX is a 1972 Civil Rights Act that bans sexual discrimination within the educational system. Sadly, the new provisions within the 2,033 page document include the following changes:

  • Narrows the definition of sexual harassment
  • Reduces options to survivors of sexual assault, dating violence and stalking
  • Reduces liability of colleges and universities
  • Reduces mandated reporting of sexual violence
  • Deregulates federal guidelines to protect sexual violence survivors
  • Changes the ‘standard of proof’ from ‘preponderance’ to ‘clear and convincing’
  • Bolsters protections for perpetrators
  • Allows for live hearings and cross examinations of the assault survivor
  • Only investigates if assault reported to ‘certain people’

23% of undergraduates and 11% of graduate students report having experienced sexual violence, AND we know survivors under-report assaults. We talk extensively about medical and legal considerations for sexual violence survivors in my "Empowering the Sexual Assault Survivor" course. Participants who took my course will need to know those protections we discussed just a few days ago are slated to be rolled back. Today, in my remote course "Trauma Informed Care", we lay the physiological and neurobiological framework for empowering the sexual assault survivor. Following that, in addition to how to continue empowering for survivors, we elaborated on the legal changes listed above.

Outrageously, these Title IX deregulating provisions are to go into effect August 14, 2020 while schools are struggling to keep students safe amid coronavirus pandemic.  Again, let us look at these percentages (23% of undergraduates, and 11% of graduate students) and think about who needs safety and protection.

Schools do have choice in whether they roll back their protections to survivors of sexual violence. If you're looking for ways to help, you may want to reach out to your alma mater and ask what changes they are planning to make in the context of this new deregulation and disempowerment of Title IX protections. Maybe contact your local sexual assault coalition and see how you can become involved.  You could also contact your legislature and/or leave comment on www.regulations.gov (search title IX and education).Empower yourself so that you can empower others! As a physical therapist specialized in pelvic rehabilitation, empowering survivors of sexual violence happens every day in my practice. I hope you feel empowered, supported and successful in doing this challenging work too!

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Celebrating Occupational Therapy Month by Celebrating OTs in Pelvic Rehab!

The Institute has welcomed occupational therapists since our founding in 2006. In addition, three OTs: Richard Sabel, MA, MPH, OTR, GCFP, Erica Vitek, MOT, OTR, BCB-PMD, PRPC, and Tiffany Ellsworth Lee MA, OTR, BCB-PMD all teach courses as members of our faculty. (Erica Vitek is also one of several OTs who holds certification as a Pelvic Rehabilitation Practitioner through H&W).

Recently, the Institute was contacted by an Occupational Therapist who has attended many of our courses, regarding a challenge she was experiencing obtaining CEUs in her state (Oregon) for courses on Pelvic Rehab and Biofeedback. In light of this, the Institute has been discussing with some of the occupational therapists on our faculty, as well as representatives of the BCIA and Marquette University, and how to spread awareness about and recognition of OT’s roles in pelvic rehab. Below, we’ve asked faculty member Erica to share a bit more about her journey and the role of the pelvic rehab occupational therapist.

Physical RehabilitationAs an OT student, I had a professor who brought in practicing clinicians to discuss their unique roles out in the field. Pelvic health happened to be one of the topics of the day. I was completely intrigued by the clinician, who had such passion about the role of OT in pelvic health. It became clear that helping people with impaired basic bodily functions was imperative to fulfilling life roles and participation; it was OT. I knew from that moment that I wanted to help people deal with these challenging, private issues.

In my journey, I did not immediately start out in pelvic health, but instead in an acute care hospital that had a women’s health program with a strong interest in pelvic health. A very experienced OT and her team of 2 additional OTs were doing great work in that department already. The window of opportunity opened for me to mentor with that group and I eventually was able to begin to get my own referrals and develop a robust hospital-based outpatient practice. At that time, ALL of my experience had been with OTs doing this work and I was naïve to the fact that outside of my world, most of the clinicians doing this type of work were physical therapists (PT). I asked to join a highly trained and skilled group within my health system of all women’s health PTs. Overtime, I was able to demonstrate my level of competency within the group of PTs and contribute valuable things to our organization. Herman and Wallace Rehabilitation Institute was instrumental in my quest to demonstrate competency as they allowed OTs a clear pathway for enrollment in their coursework and application for the Pelvic Rehabilitation Practitioner Certification examination. I can be proud to have those credentials to my name.

My challenges in the area of pelvic health practice have thankfully been minimal, nearly nonexistent, and it has come to my awareness in recent weeks that this is not the case for OTs around the country trying to develop themselves as pelvic health practitioners. My original OT mentors reassured me with the AOTA’s published document titled Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain & Process, detailed a clear place in the role of pelvic health. This document has gone through 3 revisions over the course of its first publication in 2002. The 2nd edition was published in 2008 and the 3rd edition in 2014. I’d like to cite a few important areas of the document that I find to be helpful in an OT’s quest to demonstrate our role in pelvic health rehabilitation.

"Occupational therapy services are provided for habilitation, rehabilitation, and promotion of health and wellness for clients with disability- and non-disability-related needs"

I’d first like to quote the definition occupational therapy according to the 3rd edition, “occupational therapy is defined as the therapeutic use of everyday life activities (occupations) with individuals or groups for the purpose of enhancing or enabling participation in roles, habits, and routines in home, school, workplace, community, and other settings. Occupational therapy practitioners use their knowledge of the transactional relationship among the person, his or her engagement in valuable occupations, and the context to design occupation-based intervention plans that facilitate change or growth in client factors (body functions, body structures, values, beliefs, and spirituality) and skills (motor, process, and social interaction) needed for successful participation. Occupational therapy practitioners are concerned with the end result of participation and thus enable engagement through adaptations and modifications to the environment or objects within the environment when needed. Occupational therapy services are provided for habilitation, rehabilitation, and promotion of health and wellness for clients with disability- and non-disability-related needs. These services include acquisition and preservation of occupational identity for those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. “

As we look closer at the framework and the definition of OT, there is clear evidence that the occupational therapist (OT) has a role in the treatment of pelvic health conditions. Importantly, occupations are defined by this document as “…various kinds of life activities in which individuals, groups, or populations engage, including activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation.” The clearest examples of the OT’s role in pelvic health occupations within this section include: 1) ADL section: toileting and hygiene (continence needs, intentional control of bowel movements and urination) and sexual activity. 2) IADLs section: sleep participation (sustaining sleep without disruption, performing nighttime care of toileting needs). 3) Achieving full participation in work, play, leisure, and social activities, requires one to be able to maintain continence in a socially acceptable manner in which they can feel confident and comfortable to fulfill their roles and duties.

"We believe that the great patient need that exists can be better served by having trained OTs able to treat pelvic health conditions"

Client factors as defined in this document are “Specific capacities, characteristics, or beliefs that reside within the person and that influence performance in occupations. Client factors include values, beliefs, and spirituality; body functions; and body structures.” Client factors are further identified as affecting the performance skills and participation of the clients we work with. OT’s role per definition is to “facilitate change and growth in client factors”. In order to fully enhance our client’s performance skills/participation related to change and growth in client factors, OT’s have to examine the whole person, including pelvic health impairments, which have a negative influence on performance. Within client factors, the document defines body structures as, “Anatomical parts of the body, such as organs, limbs, and their components that support body function.” Within this category, one can refer to multiple items named that relate to the care that OTs provide in pelvic health rehabilitation, including but not limited to, structures related to the digestive, metabolic, and endocrine systems and structures related to the genitourinary and reproductive systems.

Since the first email from this individual in Oregon, we have been reached by several other OTs asking about similar challenges and questions about scope of practice. Because of our commitment to honoring the AOTA’s Practice Framework, and because we believe that the great patient need that exists can be better served by having trained OTs able to treat pelvic health conditions, the Institute is working with members of our faculty and professional network to advocate for recognition of OTs in pelvic rehab and resolve confusion about scope of practice. For those interested in further resources, please check out:


American Occupational Therapy Association. (2002). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain and process. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 56, 609-639.
American Occupational Therapy Association. (2008). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain and process (2nd ed.). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62, 625-683.
American Occupational Therapy Association. (2014). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain and process. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, S1-S48.

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Upcoming Continuing Education Courses

Male Pelvic Floor - San Diego, CA (Postponed)

Dec 4, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: FunctionSmart Physical Therapy

Chronic Pelvic Pain - Medford, OR (Postponed)

Dec 4, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Asante Rogue Valley Medical Center

Pediatric Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders - Ann Arbor, MI (Postponed)

Dec 4, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Michigan Medicine

Sacral Nerve Manual Assessment and Treatment - Madison, WI (NOW REMOTE)

Dec 4, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: SSM Health

Yoga for Pelvic Pain - Phoenix, AZ (Postponed)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: St. Joseph's Hospital - Phoenix

Yoga for Pelvic Pain - Remote Course (SOLD OUT)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Male Pelvic Floor - Satellite Lab Course

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Male Pelvic Floor - San Diego, CA Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: FunctionSmart Physical Therapy

Male Pelvic Floor - Washington, DC Satellite Location

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Georgetown University Hospital

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Satellite Lab Course

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Little Rock, AR Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Core Pelvic Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Burlington, WA Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Northwest Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Self-Hosted (SOLD OUT)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Canton, OH Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Mercy Hospital

Male Pelvic Floor - Minneapolis, MN Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Fairview Institute of Athletic Medicine

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Medford, OR Satellite Location (SOLD OUT)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Asante Rogue Valley Medical Center

Male Pelvic Floor - Self Hosted

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - New Orleans, LA Satellite Location

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Ochsner Therapy and Wellness/Ochsner Health System

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - Self-Hosted

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Pelvic Floor Level 2A - New Orleans, LA (SOLD OUT)

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Ochsner Health System

Pediatric Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders - Remote Course

Dec 5, 2020 - Dec 6, 2020
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Pelvic Floor Series Capstone - Washington, DC (POSTPONED)

Dec 12, 2020 - Dec 13, 2020
Location: The George Washington University

Pelvic Floor Level 1 - Tallahassee, FL (Postponed)

Dec 12, 2020 - Dec 13, 2020
Location: Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare

Breathing and the Diaphragm - Remote Course

Dec 12, 2020 - Dec 13, 2020
Location: Replacement Remote Course

Manual Therapy for the Abdominal Wall - Remote Course (SOLD OUT)

Dec 12, 2020
Location: Short Form Remote Course

Pelvic Floor Capstone - Washington, DC Satellite Location

Dec 12, 2020 - Dec 13, 2020
Location: Georgetown University Hospital

Pelvic Floor Capstone - East Norriton, PA Satellite Location

Dec 12, 2020 - Dec 13, 2020
Location: Core 3 Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Capstone - Salt Lake City, UT Satellite Location

Dec 12, 2020 - Dec 13, 2020
Location: Pagnani Physical Therapy

Pelvic Floor Capstone - Self-Hosted

Dec 12, 2020 - Dec 13, 2020
Location: Self-Hosted Course

Pelvic Floor Capstone - Greenville, SC Satellite Location (Postponed)

Dec 12, 2020 - Dec 13, 2020
Location: Restore Pelvic Health and Wellness