(646) 355-8777
  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
Blog posts tagged in Clinical Practice

Although awareness of pelvic rehabilitation is growing, patients who are referred for pelvic rehabilitation usually have more questions than the average patient about attending therapy. This can mean that you as a provider are burdened with a lot of phone calls or emails that go something like this: can I come to the clinic if I’m on my period? what are you going to do? are you familiar with my condition? how long will it take to get better? Consider how often these questions occur with patients who have knee pain, or headaches, and you may find that pelvic rehab is perceived by patients as quite unique from other types of rehab. How can you avoid trying to find time in your busy clinical schedule to tackle these additional communications? You can start by educating your front desk to handle patient care questions related to pelvic rehab, such as the following frequently asked questions:

  • Do I need a referral from a doctor?
  • What will we do on my first visit?
  • What is biofeedback?
  • What is ____________ (proctalgia fugax, interstitial cystitis), etc?
  • I have my period, should I reschedule?
  • Do you do internal work?
  • Will my insurance cover this?

It is likely that the patient will ask to speak directly with the therapist, so you can first encourage your support personnel to politely inquire if there is something he or she could help in answering. Create a list of conditions along with a brief description of its definition, and a few examples of skills that a pelvic rehab provider has to offer. Your support staff can also offer to mail a brochure or flyer that you create which answers some of the frequently asked questions. Providing an “FAQ” section on your website that can be referred to may also decrease some of the stress of trying to play phone tag. Make no mistake that if you DO have the time to follow-up with a patient who has a question, you may create a connection that is really important for that patient in regards to scheduling an appointment. On the other hand, if you don’t have time set aside in your day for such calls or emails, you risk having the patient not get her questions answered. A form (on your site or as a written resource) might have some of the commonly asked questions written out, and you could use the ones below as an example to get you started.

Tagged in: Clinical Practice

Can patients benefit from a non-face-to-face treatment program for stress urinary incontinence? A recent study addressing this question was published in the British Journal of Urology International. This randomized, controlled trial utilized online recruitment of 250 community-dwelling women ages 18-70 years. Criteria was stress urinary incontinence (SUI) at least 1x/week, diagnosis based on self-assessment questionnaires, 2 days of bladder diaries, as well as a telephone interview with a urotherapist. The Outcomes tools included the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ISIC-UI SF), the Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life (ICIQ-LUTSqol), the Patient Global Impression of Improvement, health-specific quality of life (EQ-VAS), use if incontinence aids, and satisfaction with treatment.

The participants were randomized into 2 pelvic floor muscle training groups: an “internet-based” group (n=124) and a group who were sent information in the mail (n=126). The internet-based program contained information about pelvic muscle contractions (8 escalating levels of training), behavioral training related to lifestyle changes. The internet group received email support from the urotherapist, and the postal group did not. Pelvic floor muscle training was instructed at at least 8 contractions 3 times/day. After the 3 month training period, the internet-based treatment group was advised to continue pelvic floor muscle training 2-3 times/week, whereas the mail training group were not given any advice about continued training frequency. Follow-up data was collected at 4 months post-intervention, at 1 year and 2 years. At 2 years follow-up, 38% of the participants were lost from the study.

Within both groups, the authors report that the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ISIC-UI SF) and the Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life (ICIQ-LUTSqol) showed “highly significant improvements” after 1 and 2 years compared to baseline data. Much of the improvement occurred within the first 4 months of the study “…and then persisted throughout the follow-up period.” When comparing the internet group to the mail-only group, the perception of improvement following treatment was higher. Approximately 2/3 of the women in both groups reported satisfaction with the treatment even at the 2 year follow-up. The authors conclude that the internet or mail-based exercise programs may “…have the potential to increase access to care and the quality of care given to women with SUI [stress urinary incontinence] in a sustainable way.” Additionally, not all patients will improve significantly unless they have one-on-one intervention, leaving plenty of patients who do need our direct care.

Posted by on

The following is a contribution from Elisa Marchand, PTA, PRPC. Elisa is the first PTA to become a Certified Pelvic Rehabilitation Practitioner! Elisa started a Pelvic Floor program with a locally-owned rehab company where she mentored 3 different PT's through the years. In that time, Elisa also taught as an adjunct with the local PTA program. Elisa works at McKenna Physical Therapy in Peoria, IL.

As a physical therapist assistant, the following should cause me to rethink my passion for and practice within women's health PT. "The SOWH is opposed to the teaching of internal pelvic assessment and treatment to all supportive personnel including physical therapist assistants." (Position Statement on Internal Pelvic Floor Assessment and Treatment: Section on Women's Health, APTA; Feb 2014) It should have stopped me from sitting for and becoming the first-ever PTA certified as a PRPC. Fortunately, this is not the case.

I want to be clear from the start; I understand the need for clear boundaries with regards to the scope of practice of PTAs. However, the interpretation of these rules can get quite muddy. In the APTA's "Guide for Conduct of the PTA", the following clarifications are made, including their interpretations:

Tagged in: Clinical Practice PRPC

With ICD-10 changes right around the corner, we thought it would be helpful to put together a bit of a cheat sheet for our pelvic health providers. Keep in mind that this is only a guide, and that you and your facility should rely upon your own knowledge and skills. We hope this list makes getting to coding proficiency a little easier!

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service have a website called “Road to 10” that is very helpful for learning about all the changes that are coming up very soon, starting with “ICD-10 Basics” (they even have a countdown clock, with seconds included- no pressure!) The site has some documents for physicians, which therapists might find somewhat useful, including ones called “Common Codes for OB/GYN" or "Common Codes for Orthopedics". The Herman & Wallace Pelvic Rehabilitation Institute has created for you the Common Codes for the Pelvic Rehab Provider, For those of us in pelvic rehabilitation, the more tools that we have to make the transition easier, the better.

ICD-10 Codes are on the Incoming!There are 3 main things that are going to help with this transition: 1) knowing how ICD-10 is different than ICD-9, so that you are aware of the additional choices you may need to make, 2) having a comprehensive list of all the codes to choose from, and 3) having a shorter list of codes so you don’t have to move through the entire list!

Tagged in: Clinical Practice

The concept of patient compliance, or adherence (a more preferred term), has been the subject of many medical studies, and adherence in pelvic rehabilitation is an aspect of rehab of critical interest. Recently published results of a survey questioning providers and the public about adherence in pelvic floor muscle training offers an insightful perspective. Researchers Frawley, Dumoulin, and McClurg conducted a web-based survey which was published in published in Neurourology and Urodynamics. The survey was completed by 515 health professionals and by 51 individuals from the public. Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, health professionals and public respondents placed different value on which factors related to rehabilitation contributed the most to adherence.

Data collected in the study included topics such as barriers to adherence in pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), perception of potential benefit of PFMT, therapy-related factors including therapeutic relationship, socioeconomic factors, and issues surrounding short-term versus long-term adherence, for example. For the providers, poor motivation was rated high as a barrier to short-term adherence, whereas the patients rated perception of minimal benefit from PFMT as the most important barrier. Facilitators of pelvic muscle training included aspects of access such as having appointments outside of the typical workday, or having childcare available, transportation, and not being bored by the exercise program or feeling that the therapist has adequate training and skills.

As suggested by the authors, perhaps that most important variable agreed upon by both providers and public is that of perceived benefit. In other words, patients need to believe that the exercise program can alleviate symptoms and that what they are doing in their particular program is going to achieve positive results rather than wasting time on a home program that will not be effective. This issue is one that can be easily remedied through appropriate patient education, communication with the patient about whether or not they understand the potential value and expected recovery through program participation, and adequate training of the therapist that allows for proper diagnosis and treatment planning. The study concludes by emphasizing that health providers “need to be aware of the importance of long-term patient perception of PFMT…”

Upcoming Continuing Education Courses

Dec 4, 2015 - Dec 6, 2015
Location: Washington University School of Medicine

Dec 6, 2015 - Dec 8, 2015
Location: Southview Hospital

Dec 11, 2015 - Dec 13, 2015
Location: Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla

Dec 11, 2015 - Dec 13, 2015
Location: Marathon Physical Therapy

Jan 16, 2016 - Jan 17, 2016
Location: Florida Hospital - Wesley Chapel

Jan 16, 2016 - Jan 17, 2016
Location: Harrison Medical Center-Silverdale Rehabilitation

Jan 29, 2016 - Jan 31, 2016
Location: South University

Jan 30, 2016 - Jan 31, 2016
Location: Cherry Creek Wellness Center

Feb 5, 2016 - Feb 7, 2016
Location: Florida Hospital - Wesley Chapel

Feb 26, 2016 - Feb 28, 2016
Location: Evergreen Hospital Medical Center

Mar 4, 2016 - Mar 6, 2016
Location: Comprehensive Therapy Services

Mar 5, 2016 - Mar 6, 2016
Location: St. Luke’s Hospital Rehab Services

Mar 6, 2016 - Mar 8, 2016
Location: Touro College: Bayshore

Mar 11, 2016 - Mar 13, 2016
Location: Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital

Mar 12, 2016 - Mar 13, 2016
Location: Pacific Medical Center

Mar 12, 2016 - Mar 13, 2016
Location: Texas Children’s Hospital

Mar 18, 2016 - Mar 20, 2016
Location: The George Washington University

Mar 19, 2016 - Mar 20, 2016
Location: One on One Physical Therapy

Mar 19, 2016 - Mar 20, 2016
Location: Mercy Hospital

Apr 1, 2016 - Apr 3, 2016
Location: Marathon Physical Therapy

Apr 1, 2016 - Apr 3, 2016
Location: Mercy Hospital

Apr 2, 2016 - Apr 3, 2016
Location: Anne Arundel Medical Center

Apr 2, 2016 - Apr 3, 2016
Location: Florida Hospital - Wesley Chapel

Apr 8, 2016 - Apr 10, 2016
Location: CentraState Medical Center

Apr 8, 2016 - Apr 10, 2016
Location: Meriter Hospital

Apr 15, 2016 - Apr 17, 2016
Location: Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine

Apr 16, 2016 - Apr 17, 2016
Location: Kima - Center for Physiotherapy & Wellness

Apr 22, 2016 - Apr 24, 2016
Location: Providence St. Josephs Medical Center

Apr 23, 2016 - Apr 24, 2016
Location: The George Washington University

Apr 23, 2016 - Apr 24, 2016
Location: Mizzou Physical Therapy-Rangeline